Vice President Boakai Pays Homage to the Late Angie Brooks

Monday, 22nd October 2007

Monrovia, Liberia - Liberia’s Vice President Joseph N. Boakai has paid homage to the late Angie Brooks for the pride and dignity she brought to her native Liberia and Africa as a whole by ascending to the position of President of the United Nations General Assembly.

He described Angie Brooks as a “Great Lady of Africa”, who also brought honor to the black race in general, and thanked all who associated with and worked with her for the inspiration they drew from her.

Vice President Boakai made the commendation over the weekend, when the daughter of the fallen diplomat Angie Brooks, Eda Brooks, accompanied by the Community Mayor of Harlem in New York, Queen Mother Dr. Deloris Blakey paid a courtesy call on him.
 
He thanked Queen Mother Dr. Blakey for taking the time to come back home to see where Angie Brooks was buried, and promised to convey the message she brought to President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, who he said, ensured that the late Angie Brooks received a befitting state funeral, and insisted that all ladies attended the funeral.

Briefing the Vice President earlier, Queen Mother Dr. Blakey, an African-American who considered the late Angie Brooks a role model, said she was in Liberia to memorialize the fallen diplomat who, she said embraced all African-Americans as her own.

Dr. Blakey, a graduate of Harvard and Columbia Universities, said she first met Angie Brooks in 1969 at the United Nations and was inspired by her eloquence.

“Mama left us women with a tall order. She was able to articulate the needs of the day,” she said, referring to the late Angie Brooks.

Queen Mother Dr. Blakey said African-American women were grateful that Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, a woman, had gained state power, and were planning the first Million Woman March in Liberia.

She said the march will be preceded by a conference in Monrovia where local issues that intertwine with international issues will be discussed.

Queen Mother Blakey pledged African-Americans’ support to the government of Madam Johnson Sirleaf.