Monrovia, Liberia - The Vice President of Liberia Joseph N. Boakai has challenged citizens of Grand Bassa County not to let conflict and division stall the development of their county.">

"Don’t Let Conflict and Division Stall Your Development”, Vice President Boakai

Tuesday, 22nd July 2008
Monrovia, Liberia - The Vice President of Liberia Joseph N. Boakai has challenged citizens of Grand Bassa County not to let conflict and division stall the development of their county.

He described Grand Bassa as a county on the move, citing investments like Mittal Steel, Buchanan Renewable Energies (BRE) and the proposed transformation of Buchanan as an ‘Economic Zone’ by Chinese investors.

Vice President Boakai was addressing county and traditional leaders at the weekend at the administration building in Buchanan where they had gathered to launch the Tarpeh and Tarpeh Logging Company.

Vice President Bokai said what is happening in Grand Bassa County will serve as an inspiration to other political sub-divisions, adding, “We want to see more of this happen because  what happens here ill inspire development in other parts f the country”.

The Vice President used the occasion to call on all Liberians, irrespective of ethnic group or political sub-division, to consider themselves as one people, so that they can bring speedy development to their country.  He said he was looking forward to the day when people from Nimba or other counties would go to Zwedru, Grand Gedeh County to spend the weekend.

Earlier in remarks, Grand Bassa County Superintendent Julia Duncan Cassell warned against violence and other subversive acts.

Superintendent Cassell said it is only through dialogue that citizens of the county can resolve their differences. The Superintendent’s remarks bring to mind the violent outbursts resulting from the expansion of the Liberia Agriculture Company (LAC), culminating last year in the killing of the company’s manager  Bruno Michiels.

 Upon arrival in Buchanan, Vice President Boakai was received by Representatives Byron Brown and Daniel Smith, as well as county and traditional leaders, who offered him the traditional welcome of white kola and rice flour.