President Weah Speaks Positive Of China Trip; Says Liberia Stands To Benefit

Monday, 10th September 2018

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MONROVIA, LIBERIA:  President George Manneh Weah has spoken positively of his trip to China and the benefit Liberia stands to accrue with specific reference to the US$54 million grant and other largesse soon to be revealed.   

 

President Weah termed as successful for the country’s recovery process his visit to China in terms of the gains made in the area of re-strengthening its relations with China as well as its support for agriculture, road, health and technology under the government’s Pro-Poor Agenda.

 

China offered a US$54 million grant to Liberia for the construction of two overhead bridges, while $20 million in food aid.

 

The President made the comments Sunday, September 9, 2018 at the Roberts International Airport (RIA) upon his return from China where he joined other African leaders at the 2018 Edition of the Forum on China-Africa Cooperation (FOCAC).

 

According to him, he has the responsibility to develop the country and will do everything in his power to build partnership with other countries to bring Liberia on par with them through infrastructures, road connectivity, good healthcare system and a good educational sector.

 

The President lauded the Chinese government for the grant given the country, and revealed that more is expected to follow.

 

President Weah expressed disagreement with those who underrated the financial aid China offered Liberia, stating “No one in his/her sound mind will not appreciate a free gift from a friend.”
“It is always good to be grateful to people who give you free money to develop your country.”

 

The President said his government remains committed to the One-China policy.

 

Dozens of African leaders attended the two-day gathering, which takes place every three years as the linchpin of Chinese foreign policy in Africa and the fulcrum of its investment and lending on the continent. It is also part of China’s efforts to build greater ties with the African Continent, to reinforce China’s image of an emerging commercial and diplomatic power in Africa. It also overshadows the prospect for coordinating Chinese programs with other players, such as the United States, in support of Africa’s development objectives.